The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Lamb

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No description required here. Select from the many cuts available the least fatty. Lamb is a more fatty meat than beef. For health, buy it off the bone trimmed of fat.
Category: Meat
In Season: all year
To Buy: Buy meat that is clear and pinky-red. Avoid any with dried, brownish edges. Buy the cut depending on what you want to do with it. Cheaper cuts like the shoulder work well in casseroles, while trim lamb cuts are great for grilling.
To Store: Wrap the meat in greaseproof paper. Legs will store in the fridge for up to 4 days (place them on a rack to allow the blood to drain off). Small cuts of lamb should be used within 24 hours.
Tips & Tricks: If making a casserole prepare it the day before and set it aside to cool. Once cool you can scrape off any excess fat. It's healthier and will taste better the next day too.

Nutrition (Per serve):

Weight (grams): 95
Carbohydrates, g: 0.0
Fat (g): 6.5
Monosaturated Fat , g: 2.7
Vitamin B2: Aids in the metabolism of fats, protein and carbohydrate. Also involved in maintaining mucous membranes and body tissues, good vision and health of skin.
Iron, mg: Main function is synthesis of red blood cells, thus delivering oxygen around the body and maintaining all bodily functions.

Contraindications:
Excess accumulation may play a role in development of heart disease.
Potassium: Needed for normal growth and muscle and nerve contraction. Together with sodium regulates water and fluid balance in the body.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Low
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Energy (kJ): 576
Protein (g): 19.8
Saturated Fat, g : 3.0
Vitamin B1: Important for energy production and carbohydrate metabolism. Enhances mental capabilities and promotes a general sense of health and wellbeing.
Niacin (B3):
Zinc: Antioxidant and immune boosting, zinc fights infection and plays a role in wound healing. It is essential for growth and health of reproductive organs, especially the prostate. Needed for healthy hair, skin and nails. Also necessary for bone formation.
Phosphorus: Closely related to calcium, this mineral is an important component of bones and teeth and helps maintain the body's energy supply and pH levels.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Safe/negligible amount

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Season lamb after it has been cooked or you will lose moisture from the cut. Brush the meat with oil to prevent it sticking to the grill. Trimmed lamb pieces will take 10 minutes each side. Start with a high grill to sear the meat on both sides then reduce heat to cook through.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Anaemia

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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