Healthy Food Database

Mussels
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Most mussels today are farmed. The most common mussels are the blue mussel and the greenlip mussel. Mussels have a crescent shape and a thick shell. Blue mussels are often purple-black in colour, but can also be brown or grey depending where they were grown.

Note about amines: Fresh seafood has low amine levels, but when older than two days the amine content rises to moderate, and any fish that has been frozen has high levels.
Category: Seafood - Mollusc
In Season: all year
To Buy:
Fresh mussels must always be purchased live to ensure freshness. There are approximately 25 mussels to a kilo. Avoid any with damaged shells.
To Store:
Mussels are best stored out of water and in the refrigerator.Store for up to three days.NEVER risk eating mussels if you suspect they might be off.
Tips & Tricks:
When eating mussels throw out any that have not opened during cooking.
Cooking Tips:
Scrub thoroughly under running water and remove the beard (fibrous hair-like thread) that is attached. Mussels are cooked once their shells are opened.Steam, poach, grill, bake or barbecue. Avoid using too much liquid, allowing the mussels to cook in their own juices and retain their natural flavour.

Nutrition per Per serve:

Weight (grams):
105
Carbohydrates, g:
4.7
Fat (g):
1.8
Monosaturated Fat , g:
0.3
Niacin (B3):
Iron, mg:
Zinc:
Magnesium:
Sodium:
Salicylates:
Safe/negligible amount
Energy (kJ):
348
Protein (g):
11.9
Saturated Fat, g :
0.5
Vitamin B2:
Vitamin C:
Folic Acid:
Potassium:
Phosphorus:
Amines:
Low
Glutamates:
n/a

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Anaemia
Low Energy
Prostate Problems
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Low Libido
Immune Deficiencies
Malnutrition
Find recipes with Mussels

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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