The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Dandelion

Dandelions are enjoying their true place in the world as a beneficial, restorative plant. Often used to make wine, dandelion leaves can also be eaten, but it's the roots that are now widely known as a coffee substutute. (Don't be fooled - it tastes nothing like coffee.)
A pretty plant with a yellow flower that makes way to a ball of delicate plumed seeds that are blown off by the slightest breeze. Children love to tell the time by counting the number of blows required to blow off all the seeds.
Category: Herb
In Season:
To Buy: Buy dandelion root whole or ground from health food stores. An instant dandelion drink is also available from health food stores.
To Store: Store in the pantry in a sealed container.
Tips & Tricks: Make a soy dandy in an expresso machine using ground dandelion and warm soy milk. (Use less dandelion than you would coffee - it's very bitter.)

Nutrition (1 Cup):

Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. No information available

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: If you do stumble on some in a field add some leaves to your sandwich, or boil them up like a vegetable.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Aches & Pains
Diabetes
Fluid Retention
Inflammation
Detoxifying
Circulatory Disorders
Digestive Disorders
Hepatitis
Liver Sluggish
Colitis

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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