The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Mushroom - Flat

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These large flat mushrooms are popular for stuffing and baking in the oven. They can grow to be the size of an adult's palm. Flat mushrooms are larger in size than most mushrooms, with flatter tops. They range in size from 4-6cm, perhaps bigger. They have completely broken veils and dark brown gills. The larger the mushroom, the more flavour it will develop. The flat mushroom has a delicious meaty texture.
Category: Fungus
In Season: all year
To Buy: Look for firm, white, smooth-skinned mushrooms. Avoid any that are wrinkled, dry, discoloured or slimy. Avoid pre-packed - better to pack and inspect them yourself. Pack in the special paper mushroom bags provided.
To Store: Store in a paper bag in the crisper section of the refrigerator for up to five days. Do not store in plastic or the mushrooms may become slimy.
Tips & Tricks: Buy a special mushroom brush to brush any dirt off the mushroom. Washing them makes them slimy and because most of the goodness lies just under the skin, peeling them robs them of all their nutritional goodness.

Nutrition (1 Unit):

Weight (grams): 140
Carbohydrates, g: 2.1
Protein (g): 5.0
Saturated Fat, g : 0.0
Vitamin B2: Aids in the metabolism of fats, protein and carbohydrate. Also involved in maintaining mucous membranes and body tissues, good vision and health of skin.
Folic Acid: Important during pregnancy as this vitamin is involved in the duplication of chromosomes, preventing birth defects. Lowers the risk of heart disease and is necessary for proper brain and gut function.
Phosphorus: Closely related to calcium, this mineral is an important component of bones and teeth and helps maintain the body's energy supply and pH levels.
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Very high
Energy (kJ): 165
Fibre, g:
Fat (g): 0.4
Monosaturated Fat , g: 0.0
Niacin (B3):
Potassium: Needed for normal growth and muscle and nerve contraction. Together with sodium regulates water and fluid balance in the body.
Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. Natural

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Large, flat mushrooms are delicious baked on their own with a brush of olive oil and sprinkle of sea salt or stuffed with any number of delicious fillings. Bake on a baking sheet for 15 - 30 minutes depending on the size. Great pan fried and served on its own or as an accompaniment to a meal.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Immune Deficiencies

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

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