The Food Coach

Healthy Food Database - Cloves

Cloves are an ancient spice.
Trade between the "clove island" Ternate and China goes back at least 2500 years. In China, cloves were not only used for cooking but also for deodorisation; anyone having an audience with the emperor had to chew cloves to prevent any undesired smell. The most important production area today is the island of Pemba. The whole island is covered with clove gardens, and it is reported that the island can be smelled on any ship approaching it. Almost every cuisine around the world uses cloves, although interestingly, in Indonesia, where the tree also grows prolifically, it is used to make cigarettes and not in the food.

Cloves traditionally marry with apples, but can be used in small quantities in sweet spice mixes and curries. To rid the house of an unpleasant smell lay a couple of cloves on the electric ring of the hotplate and turn the rings to a low heat. This won't work with gas, of course. Biting on a clove will release a numbing oil which can be used as temporary toothache relief.
Category: Spice
In Season: all year
To Buy: Buy dried, whole or ground from a specialised spice store or a store where you are assured of a high turnover of product.
To Store: Store in an airtight container in the pantry. Whole cloves, stored properly, will last for many years. Ground cloves are at their best for about 15 months after purchase.
Tips & Tricks: Cloves traditionally marry with apples, but can be used in small quantities in sweet spice mixes and curries. To rid the house of an unpleasant smell lay a couple of cloves on the electric ring of the hotplate and turn the rings to a low heat. This won't work with gas, of course. Biting on a clove will release a numbing oil which can be used as temporary toothache relief.

Nutrition (100 Grams):

Amines: Amines come the breakdown or fermentation of proteins. High amounts are found in cheese, chocolate, wine, beer and yeast extracts. Smaller amounts are present in some fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, avocados, bananas.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. Low
Glutamates: Glutamate is found naturally in many foods, as part of protein. It enhances the flavour of food, which is why foods rich in natural glutamates such as tomatoes, mushrooms and cheeses are commonly used in meals. Pure monosodium glutamate (MSG) is used as an additive to artificially flavour many processed foods, and should be avoided, especially in sensitive individuals as it can cause serious adverse reactions. n/a
Salicylates: Naturally occurring plant chemicals found in several fruits, vegetables, nuts, herbs and spices, jams, honey, yeast extracts, tea and coffee, juices, beer and wines. Also present in flavourings, perfumes, scented toiletries and some medications.

For those with sensitivities, low foods are almost never a problem, moderate and high foods may cause reactions, depending on how sensitive you are and how much is eaten. Very high foods will most often cause unwanted symptoms in sensitive individuals. High

Cooking:

Cooking Tips: Cloves are delicious in sweet spice blends for fruit cakes, pickles, preserved meats and curries.

Benefits the Following Health Conditions:*

Bacterial Infections
Digestive Disorders

* This information is sourced by a qualified naturopath. It is non prescriptive and not intended as a cure for the condition. Recommended intake is not provided. It is no substitute for the advice and treatment of a professional practitioner.

PrintPrint version
EmailEmail a friend
Find recipesFind recipes
BackPrevious page