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SHARON on The crack on eggs :
I remember when eggs became a cholesterol 'no no'and ev... »
Judy on The crack on eggs :
oops. Yes Deborah is was a typo. Thank you for alerting... »
Deborah on The crack on eggs :
Is this a typo - 6 eggs a day seems a bit much ... ... »

The crack on eggs


By: Judy Davie - The Food Coach

The crack on eggs
Information sources from The Australian Egg Corporation

Growing up in Scotland my father's breakfast consisted of a boiled egg (3 ˝ minutes), with one slice of toast and butter, followed by another slice of toast with butter and marmalade. That was the routine every day of his life until the news broke that eggs were high in dietary cholesterol and could increase the risk of heart disease. His breakfast was quickly swapped to bran flakes with stewed dried fruit, and a slice of toast with margarine and marmalade. That was 40 years ago and we now know how wrong that dietary information was.
Within the last decade we were given the good news that up to 6 eggs a week was OK for anyone, regardless of whether they had high LDL cholesterol or not.
Now The National Health & Medical Research Council's Australian Dietary Guidelines say that there are no increased health risks associated with consuming eggs every day. Daily egg consumption has no effect on blood cholesterol levels in healthy people and it does not increase the risk of heart disease or stroke.
It's important to note that the Australian Dietary Guidelines do still recommend limiting foods which are high in saturated fat, such as butter, cream, cheese and animal fat but because eggs are relatively low in saturated fat (1.7 grams per 60 g) they have been given the all clear.

What is a serve?

2 large eggs (120g) is considered 1 serve. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating recommends an average daily intake of 2 ˝ serves of the following foods: lean meat and poultry, fish, eggs, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans food group.

Research shows Australians on average have a poor diet. Not only do 96% of the population not eat enough vegetables, 86% don't eat enough foods from the lean meat and poultry, fish, eggs, nuts and seeds, and legumes/beans food group daily. This is because many nutrient poor foods, like cakes, biscuits and processed meats, are taking the place of nutrient rich foods like eggs, fruit, vegetables, dairy foods and whole grains. The fact that eggs are OK every day is therefore great news for those looking to improve their nutrient intake. They not only contain the highest quality protein on the planet but also 11 unbeatable vitamins and minerals including vit A, vit E, vit B12, vit B2, iron, iodine, thiamine, phosphorus, selenium and folate. And the benefits don't stop there. Eggs are also affordable, quick, easy, and unbeatable for taste.

Comments

Deborah
Jun 15 2017 11:37AM
Is this a typo - 6 eggs a day seems a bit much ...

"Within the last decade we were given the good news that up to 6 eggs a day was OK for anyone, regardless of whether they had high LDL cholesterol or not".
Comment by: Deborah
Judy
Jun 15 2017 12:15PM
oops. Yes Deborah is was a typo. Thank you for alerting me to it. I've fixed it now
Comment by: Judy
SHARON
Jun 16 2017 8:49AM
I remember when eggs became a cholesterol 'no no'and everyone stopped eating the yolks. It seemed incredulous to me (I was a kid then) that a food staple that was only a tiny little yellow ball smaller than a golf ball with no artificial processing whatsoever could be that injurious to our health. I mean, my mother ate more chocolate than that! So I kept eating whole eggs throughout my teen and adult years. I actually probably eat more than 6 a week (but not every week)and my cholesterol is perfectly fine (I'm 50 and have always been physically active and eaten whatever I've liked, mostly sticking to healthy/whole food though).

My 20 year old son usually eats two eggs a day. As he hardly eats anything else all day (has taken Ritalin since 7 years of age and hates eating) it's probably his main source of nutrition. Even at dinner time he'd be lucky to fit in a bread-and-butter plate of food. Rarely eats lunch and definitely does not eat enough veg (I've been trying for ten years to improve this but it ain't happening!).In this scenario, how does 14 eggs a week look??
Comment by: SHARON

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